0252: /pax.cosplay

cosplay

A collective album, on location

Cosplay is one element of the PAX gaming conference that is unavoidable.  It’s everywhere and it’s glorious.  There is so much cosplay to be seen that it’s impossible to see it all.  But what if there was way to see all the cosplayers participating at PAX?  There is using the local web.

People at PAX are posting photos they take of cosplayers to Instagram but also to localweb.is/pax.cosplay.  This isn’t a personal account like Instagram, it’s a collective space where everyone is posting their cosplay photos.  And it isn’t just photos either; people are discussing the costumes, asking questions and getting answers from the cosplayers themselves.

/pax.cosplay acts as a central hub for all things cosplay during the event.  Sure they could use Twitter for something like this, but it gets noisy so quickly.  Anyone in the world can post to a hashtag.  But in /pax.cosplay, you know the people posting are from within walking distance to you.  There are lots of places online to find cosplay photos, but the ones on /pax.cosplay are also the ones you can see in person, right now.  That is the power of the local web.

Note: PAX is not officially affiliated with the local web.  The above is just an example of what could happen when the local web launches at PAX East in April.

We are building the local web and sharing a new way to use it each day.

Signup at localweb.is

Image via Anthony Chodor on Flickr

0249: /wheres.link

link

Local hashtag?  Try local instant communities.

At the PAX conference in Boston there are many ways to use the local web to enhance your experience.  If cosplay is your thing there is /pax.cosplay for general cosplay action, or /bonnie.aether.wing.kayle for a specific cosplayer, but what about a specific character?  Thats where /wheres.link comes in.

If Link is your favorite video game character you really don’t want to miss any Link cosplay at the event.  Others at PAX are taking photos of Link cosplay they see and posting to instagram and twitter, but the real magic is when they post to /wheres.link on the local web.  On /wheres.link you can find all the Link cosplay to be found at PAX and people are discussing and asking questions of the players.  “Slash wheres Link” becauses a pop-up community for all the Link fans at PAX.  By posting on /wheres.link all the Link cosplayers become…well… linked… and decide to get together for a massive Link photo shoot at noon on Saturday.  This becomes an historic event and /wheres.link shoots to the top of the front page of the local web.  Others at PAX see it at the top and get hyped about the photo shoot and being in the presence of 100+ Links.

This event wasn’t listed on the PAX website, or mobile app.  It wasn’t on a schedule or attached to a twitter hashtag.  It was the product of the type of organic community that can happen on the local web.

The first step to getting an instant community like this is to bring people together in the same place, which PAX has done.  But the local web allows people to find others with similar interests and interact and organize.  No app needed except a web browser.  /wheres.link wasn’t in planning for months before PAX.  It happened when one person posted a photo of Link to the url localweb.is/wheres.link. One Link fan browsing the local web noticed it and thought it was a cool idea so posted a photo too.  Then another.

There is a sense of spontaneity and DIY attitude that is missing from our current online life.  We have tons of apps with narrow and carefully curated experiences, but few opportunities to break out of those boxes and do what we want, whatever it is.

The local web as far as social media goes is a sandbox experience.  It is what you make of it, whether that is for gathering 100 Links together into the most epic of photos… or any of the other 248 uses currently listed here.

And we are just getting started.

Note: PAX is not officially affiliated with the local web.  The above is just an example of what could happen when the local web launches at PAX East in April.

We are building the local web and sharing a new way to use it each day.

Signup at localweb.is

Image via Ryan Quick on Flickr

0248: /bonnie.aether.wing.kayle

bonnie

Your on-site social profile

Some people just enjoy their cosplay and some people take it very seriously.  And then there is Bonnie.  She designs, creates and wears amazing and show stopping cosplay at events and conferences.  She has a Facebook page and a Twitter account and does the usual social things that creators are supposed to do, but none of these really carry much weight when she is in costume at an event.

When in costume she is turning heads and making a lot of noise in   the scene.  Posting a tweet into the twitterstorm feels insignificant.   That is why she is using the local web when she is on-the-ground at   an event.  Instead of telling people to “follow me on twitter” she asks them to reach out to her on the local web at localweb.is/bonnie.aether.wing.kayle.  There she is answering questions and talking to fans, and others are posting photos of her. Everyone she talks to in that “slash” is at the event because it only reaches a few miles.  This insures that she is talking to the most valuable people possible.

All the discussion in the slash causes it to rise near the top of the front page on the local web.  Other people checking out what’s hot at PAX see her slash and investigate.  League of Legends fans immediately recognize the Aether Wing Kayle slash and can seek her out, in person. With the local web she is able to amplify her presence but only with the people at PAX, which is perfect, because that is where she and her fans are right now.

Note: Bonnie or PAX are not officially affiliated with the local web. The above is just an example of what could happen when the local web launches at PAX East in April.

We are building the local web and sharing a new way to use it each day.

Signup at localweb.is

Image via Matt Avinger on Flickr